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Grand Valley State University    
 
    
 
  Nov 17, 2017
 
2011-2012 Undergraduate & Graduate Catalog [Archived Catalog]

Radiologic and Imaging Sciences - Program Description


For additional information about opportunities your college offers, please refer to the College of Health Professions  section in this catalog.

Director and Associate Professor: Carlton; Assistant Professors: Carlton, Pawloski; Instructors: Hollenbeck, Raaymakers, VanderPoel.

Web site: www.gvsu.edu/rad

Admission to Radiologic and Imaging Sciences

The Radiologic and Imaging Sciences majors have a competitive selection process for each major that requires completion of a secondary application. Please contact the College of Health Professions for secondary application packages. Applications are due February 1 of the sophomore year for the Radiation Therapy and Diagnostic Medical Sonography majors. There is no deadline for Radiologic and Imaging Sciences majors enrolling in the upper division baccalaureate degree completion major. Applicants are invited to enroll based on the following criteria:

  • Academic grade point average from completed prerequisite courses or equivalents (40%).

HPR 100 - Medical Terminology
BMS 250- Anatomy and Physiology I
BMS 251- Anatomy and Physiology II
BMS 309 - Laboratory in Human Anatomy
MTH 122 - College Algebra
PHY 220 - General Physics I
PHY 221 - General Physics II
PSY 101 - Introductory Psychology
SOC 280 - Social Problems
STA 215 - Statistics
One research methods course (HPR 301 - Inquiry Into Evidence Based Practice is suggested although BMS 301 or PSY 300 are available options.)
WRT 150 - Strategies in Writing

  • Academic grade point average from previous 2 calendar years or most recent 2 calendar years if the student has not been enrolled at a college or university in the past 2 calendar years (15%).
  • Evaluation from a professional writing sample (15%).
  • Evaluation from a personal interview (15%).
  • Completion of 16 hours of documented work or volunteer time in a health field (5%).
  • 2 letters of recommendation on university forms (5%).
  • Additional considerations: Additional educational, leadership, scholarly, work experience and/or volunteer activities are valued and may impact selection decisions (5%).

Admission to the RIS upper division baccalaureate degree completion major requires additional criteria of:

  • National registration in a radiologic or imaging sciences profession
    AND EITHER:
  • 2.5 GPA from previous 2 calendar years
    OR
  • 45 semester hour credits from an accredited institution of higher education with a GPA of 2.5.

Program major class size limit is based on clinical availability.

A grade of B- or better is required on all major RIS courses to continue in the program.

Two SWS courses are required for graduation. It is the responsibility of the student to select courses which will fulfill all writing requirements. RIS Program capstone courses meet one SWS requirement.

RIS Courses are defined as courses with prefixes of RIS, RIT, RIU, RIE, RIR, and RI.

100% of the mandatory laboratory procedures established by faculty and in the first laboratory procedures course in each major must be completed at master level as a prerequisite to attending any clinical education course.

Radiation Therapy, Diagnostic Medical Sonography, and Radiologic and Imaging Sciences majors may repeat a total of two RIS courses.

Any single RIS course may be repeated only once.

Independent study courses in clinical education will be scheduled only when clinical positions are available at sites with university clinical education agreements.

Independent study courses are offered at the discretion of the RIS faculty as a whole.

Radiation Therapy Major

Radiation Therapy is a Radiologic and Imaging Sciences specialty that is one of the disciplines of radiation oncology. Radiation Therapy is considered an entry-level profession in that students may enter GVSU without previous college experience and may aspire to complete the entire B.S. degree program in 4 years.

Radiation therapists practice in a collaborative effort between medical and radiation oncology physicians, medical physicists, dosimetrists, oncology nurses, dietitians, and social workers. Radiation Therapists are responsible for accurately recording, interpreting, and administering the treatment prescribed by radiation oncologists. These responsibilities require highly specialized clinical skills as well as complex critical thinking in order to effectively contribute to the team approach to patient treatment.

Students receive didactic, laboratory, and clinical experiences in both existing and emerging radiation therapy practices in the university’s energized laboratories and through a clinical education system that requires students to attend full days of clinical practice under the supervision of registered Radiation Therapists at clinical education sites located as far as about two hours from GVSU (although most clinical assignments are within one hour from campus.) Students must have transportation available to these sites.

Clinical experiences are available in both existing and emerging radiation therapy practices and procedures, including treatment planning, computed tomography simulation, conventional simulation, quality assurance, brachytherapy, external beam therapy, stereotactic radiosurgery, intraoperative procedures, intensity modulated radiation therapy, and total body irradiation.

Students who receive a B.S., degree in Radiologic and Imaging Sciences with a major in radiation therapy from GVSU are eligible for the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) examination in radiation therapy. Granting of the baccalaureate degree is not contingent on passing the ARRT examination.

Individuals who have been involved in a criminal proceeding or charged with or convicted of a crime may not be eligible for national certification by the ARRT. Because this certification is available to graduates of the radiation therapy program as part of preparation for clinical practice, students to whom this may apply are strongly advised to work with the ARRT for pre-application review of eligibility for certification from the website at www.arrt.org (Ethics, Pre-Application Process). The ARRT may be contacted by phone at 651-687-0048 for more information.

The Radiation Therapy program is accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT). The program adheres to JRCERT standards. Students have the right to notify the JRCERT if they believe the university is not adhering to these standards. The JRCERT is at 20 N. Wacker Dr., Suite 2850, Chicago, IL 60606-3182, phone 312-704-5300.

Radiation therapy students are encouraged to consider Theme 14, although students may choose any theme to meet the General Education Theme requirements.

Diagnostic Medical Sonography Major

Diagnostic Medical Sonography is a Radiologic and Imaging Sciences specialty with eight sub specialties. Grand Valley State University offers six of these sub specialties. Diagnostic Medical Sonography is considered an entry-level profession in that students may enter GVSU without previous college experience and may aspire to complete the entire B.S. degree program in 4 years. Students are required to choose a concentration in either general sonography (abdominal and obstetric-gynecology) or echocardiography and vascular sonography. Students choosing echocardiography and vascular sonography spend their 3rd year in adult echocardiography and then are assigned to either pediatric echocardiography or vascular sonography for their 4th year of study.

Breast ultrasound is offered as an emphasis in the DMS major. GVSU students desiring registration in breast ultrasound may complete the courses in this emphasis as electives while pursuing their initial credential in Diagnostic and Medical Sonography. In other situations, registered sonographers who find significant breast ultrasound to be part of their workload may return to GVSU to complete the coursework and qualify for the national examinations.

Sonographers practice a form of medical imaging that uses complex computerized high frequency sound wave and Doppler signal equipment to visualize subtle differences between healthy tissues and pathologic areas of the body, evaluate vascular flow information, and document pathologic and other conditions. The sonographer must acquire excellent knowledge of sectional anatomy, clinical medicine, pathology, and the use of sonographic instrumentation. Sonographers are responsible for patient care during procedures, which may include inpatient, outpatient, surgery, and mobile work. It is critical that sonographers have exceptional critical thinking and problem solving skills in order to develop a high level of interpersonal relationships with patients, sonographers, other staff, physicists, and physicians. Sonographers work collaboratively with radiologists, cardiologists, vascular surgeons, and other physicians to discuss differential diagnoses.

Students receive didactic, laboratory, and clinical experiences in both existing and emerging diagnostic medical sonography practices in the university’s state-of-the-art laboratories and through a clinical education system that requires students to attend full days of clinical practice under the supervision of registered Sonographers at clinical education sites located as far as about two hours from GVSU (although most clinical assignments are within one hour from campus). Students must have transportation available to these sites.

Students working toward a B.S. degree in Radiologic and Imaging Sciences with a major in diagnostic medical sonography from GVSU become eligible for the American Registry of Diagnostic Medical Sonographers (ARDMS) examinations specific to the concentrations completed. Eligibility for ARDMS examinations is achieved upon completion of 1680 contact hours (which occurs in November or December of the senior year before graduation the following April). Granting of the baccalaureate is not contingent upon passing ARDMS examinations.

Individuals who have been involved in a criminal proceeding or charged with or convicted of a crime may not be eligible for national certification by the American Registry of Diagnostic Medical Sonographers. Students are strongly advised to work with the ARDMS for pre-application review of eligibility for certification from their website at www.ardms.org (Credentials and Examinations, Application Process and Resources). The ARDMS may be contacted by phone at 301-738-8401 for more information.

The Diagnostic Medical Sonography program is accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Diagnostic Medical Sonography (JRCDMS). The program adheres to JRCDMS standards. Upon accreditation, students have the right to notify the JRCDMS if they believe the university is not adhering to these standards. The JRC-DMS is at 6021 University Boulevard, Suite 500, Elliott City, MD 21043. phone 443-973-3251.

Diagnostic Medical Sonography General Emphasis

Abdominal and Obstetrics-Gynecology concentrations
The Diagnostic Medical Sonography general emphasis prepares students for clinical practice in abdominal and obstetrics-gynecology. Vascular sonography is an elective option that is taken concurrently.

General (Abdominal and Obstetrics-Gynecology) Sonographers work collaboratively with radiologists or other specialized physicians to diagnose a diverse range of conditions using invasive and non-invasive procedures using complex computerized high frequency sound wave and Doppler signal equipment. The sonographer must acquire excellent knowledge of sectional anatomy, clinical medicine, pathology, and the use of sonographic instrumentation.

Diagnostic Medical Sonography: Echocardiography and Vascular Sonography Emphasis

Adult Echocardiography and either Pediatric Echocardiography or Vascular Sonography concentrations

The Adult Echocardiography and Pediatric Echocardiography/Vascular Sonography concentrations in the Diagnostic and Medical Sonography general emphasis prepare students for clinical practice in adult echocardiography and either pediatric echocardiography or vascular sonography.

Adult and pediatric echocardiographers practice a form of medical imaging that uses complex computerized high frequency sound wave and Doppler signal equipment to visualize cardiovascular anatomy and function. They are responsible for delineating subtle differences between healthy and pathological cardiac and vascular structure and function, evaluate cardiac blood flow information, and document pathologic and other conditions. The echocardiographer must acquire excellent knowledge of cardiac and vascular anatomy, clinical medicine, pathology, and the use of sonographic instrumentation. Echocardiographers work collaboratively with cardiologists in medical center, hospital, or private practices to produce differential diagnoses. Vascular sonographers perform patient examinations, assessments, acquire and analyze data using ultrasound and related technologies, provide a summary of findings to aid in patient diagnosis and management, and use independent judgment and systematic problem solving to produce high quality diagnostic information and optimize the complete patient study. Vascular sonographers often work collaboratively with vascular surgeons but also work in radiology and cardiology departments in hospitals and private practices to discuss differential diagnoses.

Radiologic and Imaging Sciences Major

Radiologic and Imaging Sciences are specialties that are self standing professions using either ionizing, sound, or radio radiations to produce diagnostic images and guide invasive and non-invasive procedures of the body. The Concentrations included in this major are designed to form the basis for the completion of a clinical baccalaureate degree. These specialties are considered advanced or post-primary level professions in that students are eligible for admission to the major only after acquiring a national registration in a primary radiologic or imaging sciences field (i.e., ARRT, ARDMS, or NMTCB). Eligibility for these registrations requires completion of a primary professional program from a recognized national registration organization as specified above. Although two of these programs are available at GVSU (i.e., radiation therapy and diagnostic medical sonography), this major is intended for graduates of associate degree programs that meet these professional program requirements (i.e., radiography programs).

This major is specifically designed for practicing Radiologic and Imaging Sciences professionals who wish to complete a bachelor’s degree while meeting their continuing education requirements while adding a post-primary specialty (to include national board examination eligibility). The ARRT and ARDMS currently accept college credit for CE requirements at the rate of 1 semester hour equal to 8-16 continuing education credit hours. The university offers the following concentrations with most classes meeting one night per week:

  • vascular sonography
  • breast sonography
  • computed tomography
  • magnetic resonance imaging
  • mammography and bone densitometry
  • cardiac interventional imaging (cardiac catheterization)
  • vascular interventional imaging
  • advanced radiologic sciences
  • quality management
  • clinical instruction
  • clinical supervision

Students receive didactic, laboratory (depending on the concentration) and clinical experiences in the university’s energized laboratories and through a clinical education system that allows students to schedule individually tailored and mutually agreed upon time for clinical practice under appropriate supervision at clinical education sites located as far as about two hours from GVSU (although most clinical assignments are within one hour from campus). Students must have transportation available to these sites.

Clinical experiences are available in all specialties.

Students who complete a Radiologic and Imaging Sciences concentration from GVSU may become eligible for the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) or American Registry of Diagnostic Medical Sonographers (ARDMS) examinations in the specialty that matches the concentration areas of study that have been completed, upon completion of specific clinical requirements that are promulgated by the credentialing organizations. Information on these requirements changes from time to time and is available on the credentialing organization websites. GVSU provides opportunities for additional clinical education experiences to help students meet these requirements. Granting of the baccalaureate degree is not contingent on passing ARRT or ARDMS examinations.

Individuals who have been involved in a criminal proceeding or charged with or convicted of a crime may not be eligible for national certification by the ARRT or ARDMS. Students to whom this may apply are strongly advised to work with the ARRT for pre-application review of eligibility for certification from their website at www.arrt.org (Ethics, Pre-Application Process). The ARRT may be contacted by phone at 651-687-0048 for more information. Students are strongly advised to work with the ARDMS for pre-application review of eligibility for certification from their website at www.ardms.org (Credentials and Examinations, Application Process and Resources). The ARDMS may be contacted by phone at 301-738-8401 for more information.

 The following programs are available:

Bachelor of Science in Radiologic and Imaging Sciences 

Bachelor of Science in Radiation Therapy 

Bachelor of Science in Diagnostic Medical Sonography